Internet InfoMedia french 2024 parliamentary election results in maps and charts
Internet InfoMedia 2024 03 29 international elections results france facebookJumbo v10

No party secured an absolute majority in legislative elections on Sunday, leaving France headed for gridlock or political instability.

Support for left-wing parties surged unexpectedly in nationwide legislative elections on Sunday, pushing the nationalist, anti-immigration National Rally into third place.

The electoral map showed enduring divisions — with Paris and its suburbs voting for the left and center, and the regions in the far north and south along the Mediterranean voting for the far right.

The country’s political outlook appeared more muddled than before, with three large political blocs, each with a vastly different vision and plan for the country.

Group
Percent of votes

Seats
Seats

New Popular Front (NFP)

26.9% 178

Macron + Allies (Ens.)

22.3 150

National Rally + Allies (RN)

37.3 142

The Republicans (LR)

5.1 39

Other Right

3.5 27

Other

5.0 41

Number of seats won in 2024 compared with 2022

2024
289 seats needed for majority
NFP

178 seats
Ens.

150
Other

68
LR

39
RN

142
2022
NUPES

131 seats
Ens.

245
Other

51
LR

61
RN

89

Source: Ministry of the Interior

By Andrew Park, Jasmine Lee, Urvashi Uberoy and Véronique Brossier

  • The biggest surprise on Sunday was the triumph of the New Popular Front, a coalition of left-wing parties that is now the dominant force in a bloc of about 190 lawmakers and that has emerged as the lower house’s leading political group.

  • The centrist coalition of President Emmanuel Macron, who cast the country into turmoil a month ago by calling the election, was in second place with 150 seats.

  • Another shocker was the third-place finish of the National Rally and its allies, which had been expected to win the most seats, if not an absolute majority, in the 577-member National Assembly, the more powerful lower house.

France’s left-wing parties and Mr. Macron’s centrist coalition pulled out over 200 candidates from three-way races in districts where the far right had a chance of clinching a seat. Many voters who abhorred the far right then cast their ballot for whoever was left — even if the candidate was hardly their first choice.

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