Internet InfoMedia venezuelas 2024 presidential election what to know
President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela holds a microphone as he speaks to a crowd.
President Nicolás Maduro firmly controls Venezuela’s political, financial and security institutions. Adriana Loureiro Fernandez for The New York Times

The outcome of Venezuela’s presidential election, which will take place on July 28, will be consequential for the future of the country’s democracy, as well as for the more than seven million Venezuelans who have abandoned the country and have contributed to a migrant surge in the United States.

For the past 25 years Venezuela’s government has been controlled by Chavismo, the socialist movement that began with the democratic election of Hugo Chávez in 1998 and has since grown more authoritarian. When Mr. Chávez died in 2013 his protégé Nicolás Maduro narrowly won the presidency.

Venezuela’s economy imploded nearly a decade ago, prompting one of the world’s largest displacements in Latin American history. The flow of Venezuelans and other migrants to the United States has become a dominant theme in the U.S. presidential campaign.

This is the first Venezuelan election in more than a decade in which an opposition candidate has a reasonable — if slim and improbable — chance at winning.

At stake is also the future of Venezuela’s oil reserves, the world’s largest; the continued strength of the country’s alliances with China, Russia and Iran; and the trajectory of an internal humanitarian crisis that has propelled a once prosperous nation into immense suffering.

People in the Catia neighborhood of Caracas, the Venezuelan capital, lined up to vote last year in a primary election held by the opposition.Adriana Loureiro Fernandez for The New York Times
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